A Mouse's Tale

Random scurryings of a writer.

Frozen Eggs

Yes, you read that right. I had this idea a while ago that if I could cook and freeze eggs (like in fried egg and cheese style) that I might have a shot at having a much healthier breakfast on a daily basis. So I’ve been doing a ton of research as of late! Unfortunately, it seems that the egg yolks are the only part that you can cook and freeze. Here’s a good summary of the information that I found.

From http://whatscookingamerica.net/Eggs/FreezingEgg.htm:

Whole Eggs: To freeze whole eggs or yolks crack them into a bowl and gently stir to break up the yolk somewhat. Try not to incorporate air into the eggs. Label the container with the date and the number of eggs. They can be kept frozen for a year, and should be thawed in the refrigerator the day before you intend to use them.

Egg Yolks: To inhibit yolks from getting lumpy during storage, stir in a 1/2-teaspoon salt per 1-cup of egg or yolks. If using for desserts, use 1-tablespoon sugar or corn syrup per 1-cup yolks or whole eggs. Label the container with the date and the number of egg yolks. Use up extra egg yolks in recipes like sauces, custards, ice cream, yellow cakes, mayonnaise, scrambled eggs, and cooked puddings.

Egg Whites: Raw egg whites do not suffer from freezing (cooked egg whites are very rubbery). No salt or sugar is needed. Break and separate the eggs one at a time, making sure that no yolk gets into the whites. Pour into trays and freeze until firm. Label the container with the date and the number of egg whites. Use up extra egg whites in boiled frostings (i.e., 7-minute frosting), meringue cookies, angel food cake, white cakes, or meringue for pies.

Hard-Cook Egg Yolks: Hard-cooked egg yolks can be frozen to use later for toppings or garnishes. Carefully place the yolks in a single layer in a saucepan and add enough water to come at least I inch above the yolks. Cover and quickly bring just to boiling. Remove from the heat and let stand, covered, in the hot water about 15 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon, drain well and package for freezing.

Hard-cooked whole eggs and whites become tough and watery when frozen, so don’t freeze them.


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One response to “Frozen Eggs

  1. sensiblevermonter April 24, 2009 at 7:10 pm

    Huh… I never thought about freezing eggs, but it makes a lot of sense, like making a quiche and freezing half for later. Good information!!!! Thank you!!!!

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